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The Right Honourable Sir James Bailey MP
 

This is quite a long article so to help here are some quick LINKS:
[1] More on James's siblings and parents
[2] The Bailey Hotel, Kensington
[3] Timeline, census information & the many achievements of James's Life
[4] James's death and Press release plus Obituary
[5] More on James's children

THE JAMES BAILEY STORY

If there is anything you would like to add, please get in touch.
This page is still under construction

The life of James Bailey is well documented from about 1874 when he was 34 years of age for he had become a man of some considerable status and means. On Monday the 18th of December 1905 he was knighted by King Edward VII at Buckingham Palace for his achievements and contribution to the community. However his early life is not so clear and throws up several questions which may never be answered but here we look at the facts we have found and some possibilities as to what took him to London and how he acquired his wealth.

James Bailey was born on November 10th 1840 at Mattishall, Norfolk. He was baptised together with his younger brother Robert at All Saints Church Mattishall on March 12th 1843. Both boys were recorded as the sons of William Bailey a labourer and his wife Sarah née Dunthorn(e). William and Sarah had married five months earlier at St Peter's Church Mattishall Burgh on June 8th 1840. There is a family rumour that someone other than William was the father of James. There is no evidence to prove this although it is noted in the census records James and William are never under the same roof so it is unclear if they ever had a close bond. What does seem apparent is, James had a different upbringing to his siblings. Delving a little further back on the life of Sarah Dunthorne reveals Sarah had given birth to an illegitimate son (George Dunthorn) in 1837, he was baptised at St Peter's Church Mattishall Burgh on March 12th of that year.

We tend to think of James as a loner but he did have siblings: - His half brother George Dunthorne (1837) next was James himself (1840) Robert (1843) William (1846), Henry (1849) Mary (1851) Ann (1853) Sabina (1855) Frederic (1857) & Alice Dunthorne (1861). Both Ann and Sabina died as infants and are buried in St Peter's Churchyard, Mattishall Burgh. Alice died in 1870 at the age of 9 and is buried in St Mary's Churchyard Eston, North Yotkshire. Frederick must have died sometime between 1871-1881. From the evidence taken from James's Will it is apparent James helped his siblings financially over the years and on his death left them all a legacy- More on James’s siblings later.

In the 1841 census James was 7 months and shows his mother and half brother (George Dunthorne now age 5) living with his grandmother (Sarah's mother) 60 year old widow Mary Dunthorne, recorded as a Farmer of Low Street Mattishall Burgh. Mary's husband (Henry Dunthorne) had died on August 18th 1838. Sarah's husband, William a 20 year old agricultural labourer was not with them in this census, he was found to be living a few doors up with John Gedge a 75 year old Shoe-Maker. It is uncertain what Mary Dunthorne's property was like but it would not have been that small that William could not have been with his family, so why were they living separately? Could it be that although he had married Sarah he could not except the fact that both boy's were not his own? However by the time Robert was born in 1843 there was some form of acceptance as both James and Robert were baptised together (mentioned above) and William is declared in the church records as father to both.

We now jump ten years to the 1851 census where we find both William and Sarah (James’s parents) living at Badley Moor Mattishall. They are recorded as ‘Borley’. William is a 30 year old agricultural labourer and Sarah his 35 year old wife. With them are James’s siblings Robert aged 7, William age 5 and an infant aged 5 weeks which we assume to be Mary. William and Sarah’s other son Henry age 2 was staying with his grandmother 76 year old Mary Dunthorne recorded as a widow and a retired farmer at Mattishall Burgh. George Dunthorn and James were not with them.

Ten year old James, recorded as a farm labourer was living with James Cobb, a thirty two year old farmer of North Tuddenham and his wife Ann. James Cobb had married Ann Mathews in the December quarter of 1850. It is strange that a 10 year old boy is separated from his family and put out to what appears to be employment. With the question of James’s parentage in mind, was James Cobb his father? They certainly shared the same Christian name. James Cobb’s farm was situated on what was then Norwich Road and according to the census sheet the next record on the census return is The Rectory belonging to St Mary's church. The rector at the time was Thomas Peacock a widower in his 95th year. A few weeks after the census the Rev Thomas Peacock died and a new rector was appointed. His name was the Rev Robert Barry; he was 30 years old, born at Whitby, Yorkshire and married. His wife was Mary Ann née Page of 'Kensington'! No record has ever been found that they had children. Rev Robert's father, also Robert was recorded as ‘Patron’ to the parish. Robert (Snr) was in his own right a very wealthy man, and this would prove to have great advantages to the North Tuddenham Parish. The Barry family had acquired their vast wealth from their ship building business founded at Whitby in the mid 1700's. Their ships were commissioned by the King to transport troops to France and later used as convict and immigrant sailing ships before moving more into cargo. The Barry's had homes in Yorkshire (they owned most of the Fylingdales estate) and Endsliegh Street (1850) and Tavistock Square London (1841). In the early 1800’s the Barry Firm concentrated on Ship-owning and Trading. It was shortly after Robert Barry (the older) succeeded his father John, at head of the firm that offices were acquired in New Chambers, Bishopsgate and all the business associated with the family fleet of ships was conducted from the City of London.

Virtually from day-one the new rector set about making his mark on the parish. His first project was to build a new rectory more fitting for his status and maybe also to comfort his wife who would have been used to a far higher class of accommodation than the old rectory. The family was used to having staff in their employ so all this activity would have involved a lot of local labour, so we have to wonder if our young James Bailey was drawn in and became part of it. Knowing today what we know now of James he was a man who was always looking at bettering himself so maybe this 10 year old farm boy saw an opportunity and took it.

James had made a claim he received his schooling at Dereham Grammar School but there was no Grammar School in Dereham at this time so we can only assume he was educated at village level or maybe given private tuition. We do know the Rev Barry had a great interest in schooling for he built at his own expense a new school for the North Tuddenham parish, although this did not open until 1871. However in 1854 in the Francis White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory, of Norfolk (North Tuddenham) it states “and here is a small school supported by the rector”. If James was favoured by the Barry’s was it they who saw to his schooling? The question has to be asked, if James had received grammar school education would he then have taken employment as a general house servant? Where we next find him in 1861.

1861 census: James (now age 20) was living in London at 12 Taviton Street, St Pancras. On the census he was recorded as a 'General Servant' in the household of Dr. James Butterworth Ditchfield MD a Physician with offices also in Paris and Glasgow. Although the doctor was not at home at the time James was part of the household of two other servants serving the doctor's wife, Mrs Eliza Ann Ditchfield née Brown and their 13 year old son Arthur. What is very noticeable is the fact that the Rev Robert Barry’s father’s London home in 1841 was Tavistock Square, which is the next road to Taviton Street and at the time of the Rev. Robert Barry's marriage to Mary Page in 1850 it was Endsliegh Street which runs parallel to Taviton Street - this can’t be just coincidental? The Barry's were renowned for socialising so we would assume they were well known in this area and maybe had quite a circle of friends. The Rev Robert Barry had also been ordained by the Bishop Blomfield in St Paul’s Cathedral in 1847 and became curate of St Pancras Church which was less than a mile away. This highlights the question even more, had James Bailey been involved with the Barry's during the years 1851 - 1861 and was it they who took him to London by recommending him to the Ditchfield’s.

This was a very affluent area of London, as a point of interest living next door to the Ditchfield's at number 11 Taviton Street was Richard Twining a 53 year old Banker and Tea Merchant the grandson of Thomas Twining the founder of the Twining tea empire. Queen Victoria granted Twinings its first Royal Warrant for tea in 1837 – she appointed Twinings as supplier of teas to her household. Twinings has had the honour of supplying every successive British Monarch to date. Charles Dickens had lived only a few yards away at Tavistock House (1851 - 1860) situated on the east side of Tavistock Square.

On Thursday April 19th 1869 James Bailey a 29 year old bachelor and Lodging House Keeper of Hay's Mews London married Catherine Smith a 29 year old spinster of Piccadilly London at the Parish Church, St George's Hanover Square, entry 182. According to the family story Catherine was said to have been working in another household as an under-cook, however no occupation was recorded on their marriage certificate. Also stated was the fact that Catherine was the daughter of John Smith a blacksmith of Benson, Oxfordshire. James had recorded his father as William Bailey, his occupation a Miner!! Which is a change from a farm labourer for as we know now William and his family had moved to North Yorkshire, we assume to find better employment and if this information is correct was working in the iron mines. It has to be noted despite the stories of parenthood James did acknowledge William as his father. Both Bride and Groom signed.

James and Catherine had 6 children: Alice Kate Notley (1870-1965), Augusta Dunthorne (1872-1949), Percy James (1873-1947), Marie Elizabeth (1876-1959), Frederick George Glyn (1880-1951) and Sidney Robert (1882-1942). More on the children later.

In 1871 James and Catherine were living at 7 St George Terrace, Kensington. James was recorded as a 30 year old Lodging House Keeper and by this time their daughter Alice Kate Notley Bailey was 1 year old. Also with them in their employ were two servants Sophia Howard age 17 and Sarah Edwards age 19 from Mattishall Burgh Norfolk. We can see here James kept close contact with Mattishall as Sarah was the daughter of John Edwards an agricultural labourer and his wife Susanna née Beckham of Low Street Mattishall Burgh. No family connections have been found to-date so we can only assume it was a favour James did for the Edwards’s family. The properties at St George Terrace (demolished in 1905) were (according to historical records) leasehold so we assume James was at this time employed by the owners and this is where he first got his taste of the hospitality business.

This page is still under construction

The Bailey Hotel Kensington

The next we have on James is in 1874 when he was recorded negotiating an agreement with landowner Henry Browne Alexander (LINK) and developers Charles Aldin Jr and William Aldin (Aldin and Sons) to take on the lease of the property they were about to build on the corner of Gloucester Road and Courtfield Road.
Right from the early stage of the development of the new Alexander Estate at Kensington it was their intention to build a substantial hotel on the south corner of Gloucester Road and Courtfield Road. A plot of 75 feet by 126 feet was reserved for this purpose in a building agreement made by H. B. Alexander with the Aldins in March 1875. It was to be not inferior in construction to the Buckingham Palace Hotel, Buckingham Gate, and would ‘in all respects be conducted in the most respectable manner’. In addition, the Aldins were to build houses and shops on the adjacent sites down to the corner with Harrington Gardens. Behind the frontage they were to lay out Grenville Mews. The building would take James's name The Bailey Hotel


The Bailey Hotel (LINK).

Aldin and Sons were a well established Kensington firm and at their peak employed over 500 men. The Bailey Hotel address was 140 Gloucester Road Kensington however the main entrance is on Courtfield Road, opposite Gloucester Road tube station. The first part of the new hotel building was started by the Aldins in November 1874 and leased in May 1876 (normally a 21 year lease). Its architect is unknown. It was extended along Courtfield Road in the following year. In 1881, nine recently erected stables in Grenville Mews were demolished to make a garden and enlarge the hotel, including a single-storey bow on the ballroom in the centre of the garden façade. The curtailment of the mews, with its noise and smells, would have been a boom for the comfort of Bailey's guests. The garden would have looked through to the adjoining garden behind the houses in Courtfield Road, Ashburn Place and Harrington Gardens; its site is currently occupied by the Bombay Brasserie. Grenville Mews was further diminished in 1883 for the benefit of extra hotel bedrooms, but its southernmost section and the ornamental archways at its north and south ends survive. (SOURCE)

There appears to be a window of some three years (1871-4) where James acquired enough wealth or the credibility to raise what had to be considerable finance to carry out such a large comitment and assuming things were the same then, what was used as security? In 1861 he was a general servant, ten years on a lodging house keeper; next from all accounts he built the Harrington Hotel and now the Bailey Hotel. Even in those times this would be way, way beyond the reach of most well strapped businessmen.

One family story given as to how James obtained his wealth: as young man, James was employed as a Footman at a large house and estate in Essex with his future wife Catherine. The story goes on to say that the couple made off with a pair of silver candlesticks, the sale of which enabled them to start up in business in a small way viz: a street barrow selling greengrocery! With this and it is believed the boarding-house at St Georges Terrace had been a money-spinner enabled James to have a hotel built in Kensington, aptly named Baileys Hotel.

Another story put forward by James’s descendants is: they thought they had found a clue to the mystery of his birth but proving it was the problem. They claimed one member of the Bailey family owned a portrait of Admiral de Saumarez, and it was believed that James Bailey was footman at the de Saumarez estate in Essex. They had ruled him out as being James’s father as he died in 1836 but he did have sons. Did they have any connection with this part of Norfolk? The Hon De Saumarez attended James’s funeral and the Hon Arthur Saumarez attended the memorial service. Rather surprising in view of the fact that James was reputed to have run off with the family silver candlesticks! Perhaps there was a family connection and they admired his audacity, and subsequent success in the world.

Whatever way you look at this, these stories, as romantic as they sound are not credible. No ill-gained proceeds from stolen candlesticks and a few years selling greengrocery together with being a house-keeper could ever equate to this type of wealth, and that’s assuming they actually got away with the crime. Common sense has to say James must have had a backer, or someone which had at their disposal considerable funds to give security to a project of this scale and grandeur bearing in mind this venture was to attract the wealthy and the aristocracy. This was not the first building project undertaken by James for a few years earlier James built his first hotel, the Harrington Hotel at 25 Gloucester Road. Lets look at some possibilities:

  • History has shown James had charisma, flare and an aptitude for business which he took later into his political life and other ventures which he founded, more of this further down this page. So who had such collateral, one theory brings us back to the Barry family, Robert Barry (Snr) was renowned for his large building projects. If James did have a connection with Robert Barry could the Barry's have been partly behind this? More on the Barry's can be found HERE.
  • Financial institutions were important sources of capital in South Kensington, especially in areas where the erection of big houses involved the outlay of commensurably large sums of money. Freake builders was one of the first speculative builders to borrow from insurance companies, to the extent of at least £120,000 from the Royal Exchange Assurance and £80,000 from the County Fire Office over a number of years. The latter also lent £50,000 to Aldin in 1857, and the London Assurance and other companies backed Aldin and several of his fellow builders, often with handsome advances.
  • It is also noted that James knew and apparently was well thought of by the entrepreneur Edgar Cohen as they served on the board of Harrods together. So could Cohen have had anything to do with James's rise in status? Cohan was renowned for financing business ventures one such venture being Lillie Langtry. He is recorded as financing Ms Langtry from 1900-1903 when she became lessee and manager of London's Imperial Theatre, opening on the 21 April 1901 after an extensive refit. Ms Langtry also lived within walking distance of the 'Bailey Hotel' on Gloucester Road at 21 Pont Street 1892-1897 when the premises became the 'Cadogan Hotel' where Oscar Wilde was arrested in 1895 and then 8 Wilton Place.
  • Another possibility, and one closer to home: Catherine's father (John Smith a Master Blacksmith) died about 1873-4. We find his widow living by way of private means with James and his family at the Bailey Hotel in 1881. Was it a simple case that Catherine's mother backed him, if not wholly maybe in part? We do know now that James thought of his mother in-law with some affection for even though he had remarried after Catherine's death he left in his Will a legacy to be paid to her for the remainder of her life.

By 1881 James had the Bailey Hotel in full flow, James and Catherine and their five children were actually living on the premises including Catherine's mother who was recorded as Elizabeth Smith a 66 year old widow living on private means. In addition, staff, visitors and their servants numbering ninety eight altogether.

Taken from an article on London's Cultural History:
Bailey's Hotel at Gloucester Road was purpose built and prospered thanks to its convenience for visiting nearby museums of South Kensington. The proprietor, James Bailey lived on the premises with his family and thirty-five live-in staff, thus ensuring by his omnipresence that the enterprise should "in all respects be conducted in the most respectable manner" For many Victorians the word 'hotel' had French connections of loucheness. Bailey's was an immediate success, extended three times in a decade of it opening. Americans who held no high opinion of English hotels, constituted an important market and Bailey's hit it. A contemporary guidebook reassured transatlantic travellers that they would find themselves in "rich and substantial surroundings", with the most up-to-date sanitation, stringent fire precautions, an excellent wine cellar and a "cosy, homelike atmosphere" - and in "the healthiest and most fashionable part of London".

As for the Bailey’s Hotel. even though the project was certainly one of the greater ones in the area. Bailey’s was very modern for the time in which it was built. In 1885, the advertisements could boast an “ascending room” (a lift), a “safe room” a safe and bathrooms on every floor. These were all very unusual at the time. The Hotel saw many prominent guests already in its early years. The American author 'Francis Bret Harte' and the Austrian composer 'Eduard Strauss' stayed at the Hotel in 1885. Victorian records also show that a grand ball held at the Hotel, was attended by British and Dutch Royals.
Mary Ann Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), known by her pen name 'George Eliot', was an English novelist, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She had come up to from Surrey on November 29th 1880 and booked into the Bailey Hotel which was then only four years old. She was to stay until December 3rd which would be only nineteen days before she died. She said the hotel had both dignity and luxury. During her stay at Bailey's, George Eliot did some reading and took advantage of the proximity of shopping and the museum built up after the 1851 Exhibition. On the third day she walked to South Kensington Museum. Besides providing access to these conveniences, Bailey's met George Eliot's requirements in the chilly November weather. 'James Nasmyth', the engineer and inventor of the 'Steam Hammer' died whilst staying at the Bailey on May 7th 1890. Nasmyth was also a keen astronomer and because of his interest in the moon, a crater on the moon was later named after him.

Sketch of Sir James Bailey

A substantial contingent of the Bailey's Hotel’s customers at the time was Americans, who had come either in business or as tourists. The Hotel was very popular among these and the Survey of London’ quotes an American tourist guide published in 1891, which commended the Hotel for its cosy, homelike atmosphere, which is enhanced by the rich and substantial surroundings. The same guide also prised the wine as well as the fire and sanitary arrangements.

By 1891 James Bailey had acquired 33 Harrington Gardens as his private residence conveniently close to the Hotel. James by then also owned the South Kensington Hotel in Queensgate Terrace. James began a gradual exit from the Hotel business. He sold both of his hotels to Spiers and Pond Limited in 1894, but remained as Managing Director until 1898. The reason for this change was his growing official career. The Hotel had several owners and it's history is well documented but in the early 1970 the Hotel was nearly lost to redevelopment but the Town Planning Committee of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea declared in 1974 that ‘it would be a great loss to the Borough if this hotel, with its historic associations, were to be demolished’. Some information has been taken from the Bailey Hotel 'History' document & British History on-line.


The Bailey today

James Bailey was a Director of 'Harrod’s Stores' Limited from the incorporation of the company in November 1889, until his death in October 1910. He attended his last Board meeting at Harrods on 5 October 1910, a few days before his death. The flotation of Harrod’s Stores Limited in 1889, when C. D. Harrod retired and sold his business, was organized by the entrepreneur Edgar Cohen. We assume Cohen selected the members of the Board, including James Bailey and the Chairman, Alfred Newton. A few years later Cohen was involved in the flotation of 'D. H. Evans' in Oxford Street, later to become 'The House of Frazer' and Bailey and Newton became directors of that company too. At Harrods it is thought James Bailey’s experience as a successful hotelier would have been useful, as well as his local knowledge as a resident of the area. Information kindly supplied by Mr. Sebastian Wormell - Harrods Archivist. (LINK)

James won his seat in the House of Commons at his first attempt, in a by-election in May 1895 following the death of the Liberal MP William Saunders. He was elected as a Member of Parliament for the Walworth division of Newington (Constituency was abolished in 1918) and remained so until 1906. He entered the House of Commons on 13 July 1895 and left the House on 8 January 1906. He did not stand for Parliament again. During the eleven years he sat at Westminster he made many friends. He was one of the Kitchen Committee of the House of Commons and it is no exaggeration that he saved the Committee a large sum of money, and placed the Commissariat upon solid and firm business lines.

James's initiation into government was to become part of the first coalition of Conservative's and Liberal Unionist's formed in 1895. He was to serve under two Prime Ministers: Marquess of Salisbury, 1895 - 1902 a Conservative and it was this government which would conduct the Boer War from 1899 to 1902, the war was exploited by the government to help win a landslide victory in the general election of 1900. Then Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour another Conservative to December 1905. The Labour Party was only in its infancy having been formed in 1900 but they did not win power until 1924. Although women had not got the vote at this time James would have been well aware of the Suffragette Movement which was gathering strength during his time in government.

As mentioned at the beginning of this article the remaining part of James's story is well documented and is best followed through these pages 'Timeline' of James's life.
Timeline, census information & the many achievements of James's Life

This page is still under construction

More on James's siblings and parents:

It is with interest that we take a moment to look at what was happing in James’s family at this time. It appears James’s was not alone in his interest with the hospitality business as we find some of his sibling also had connection, although it is without question James did have the most success.

George Dunthorne (1837) half brother to James
Thanks to Alan Dunthorne (The Gt, Gt, Great Grandson of George Dunthorne 1837) we now have more information on his life and family.
At the age of ten George had a run-in with the law for on the June 30th 1847, he was tried at Norwich County Sessions for Embezzlement and sentenced to 14 days imprisonment. A few years later George and his half brother Robert Bailey had travelled over 200 miles from Norfolk to the Guisborough/Eston area of North Yorkshire where George got employment as an Ironstone Miner, Robert on the Railway. Robert and George took lodgings separately for in 1861 we find George lodging at Cleveland Street Guisborough with William Johnson also an Ironston miner originally from Bawdeswell Norfolk, and his wife Elizabeth née Bailey. Elizabeth being a Bailey could just be coincidence as no link up of the families have been found to date. Elizabeth was the daughter of James Bailey a Farmer of Bressingham.
George married Mary Ann Mays in the June quarter of 1866 in the Guisborough ditrict. Mary Ann was born in 1846 at Brancaster, Norfolk she was register at birth solely as Mary, however she was baptised Mary Ann at St Mary The Virgin Church Brancaster. For some reason she was baptised three times that same year and recorded as the daughter of Robert Mays a labourer and his wife Phoebe née Sporne. The following year
Robert would marry Mary Ann's sister Fanny.
In 1871 George and Mary Ann were living in Eston, Yorkshire, where he was a Beerhouse Keeper at the Brown Jug Tavern on William Street. They had one daughter, Antoinette (1867 - 1941) and a general servant Sarah Ann Mays aged 13, who was Mary Ann's younger sister. His mother Sarah, stepfather William Bailey and two half-brothers were living a few streets away at 18 Guisborough Street. In the 1881 Census George and and his wife Mary Ann have five children - Antoinette (1867 - 1941), Foreste Vane (1873 - 1946), Alice May (b1874), Ada Maude (1876 - 1912), and Ethel Kate (1878 - 1949) - and are now living at 28/30 Henry Street, South Bank. George is working as a Grocer. George would remain in Eston until his retirement when the family moved to Ormesby, Middlesbrough. George died in the September quarter of 1929 age 92 at 133 Queen Street Coatham Redcar Yorks, he left £5037 17s 4d. In todays money (2015) this would equate to £414,817.94
Mary Ann had died in the June quarter of 1921 age 74.
In James's Will of 1910 he left George £250.00 and forgave any debt or loan owed to him. In todays money (2015) this would equate to £20,588.54. Comparison figure approximate.

Robert Bailey (1843)
From all accounts Robert and George had gone to North Yorkshire together in search of work sometime before 1860 and both from all accounts were successful in getting employment. In 1861 Robert was a labourer on the Railway, he was lodging at Cleveland Street, Guisborough with Charles Carson originally from Swanton Morley, Norfolk and his wife Sarah née Harris also from Swanton Morley.
Robert married Fanny Elizabeth Mays in the June quarter of 1867. As mentioned above Robert and George had married two sisters from Barnacaster Norfolk, the sisters had been brought to North Yorkshire by their parents a few years earlier. Fanny had been registered as Charlotte but baptised on March 26th 1848 as Fanny Elizabeth. Both girls were the daughters of Robert Mays a labourer and his wife Phoebe née Sporne of Brancaster. In the early 1850's there had been a large recruitment drive for labour to work in the mines as a lucrative Main Seam of ironstone had been identified in the Eston area, prompting a spate of new mines across the Cleveland Hills.
In 1871 Robert and Fanny were living at 15 Skelton Road Brotton, Guisborough with their son Robert Henry just 11 weeks old. By 1881 Robert had taken over from George as Landlord of the Brown Jug Tavern on William street Eston. Robert and Fanny had five children whilst living at Eston but from all accounts the Hotel business was not for him for sometime about 1885-6 they left the Brown Jug and moved back to Tibenham, Norfolk where they had four more children.
In 1891 the family had moved to Hartismere-Suffolk where Robert had taken up farming. In 1901 Robert was still farming, the families address was The Farm House Mellis, Mellis St Mary, Suffolk, there were still six children at home. Robert had retired from farming by 1911 and had moved to Jubilee House Needham Market, on the census return it stated Fanny had given birth to 14 children 5 of which had died. On the same census 2 of their children where still living at home, James a 31 year old farm labourer and Fenella a 23 year old teacher.

Robert died in the December quarter of 1917 age 75 and Fanny Elizabeth died in the September quarter of 1929 at Bury St Edmund's age 81.
In James's Will of 1910 he left Robert £500.00 and forgave any loan or debts owed to him. In todays money (2015) this would equate to £41,177.08. Comparison figure approximate.

William Bailey (1846)
William seem different to the rest of the family and certainly did not share the same ambitions, for apart from a short spell away from home serving as a 15 year old Errand Boy in the employ of Richard Dubery and his wife Marie at Henreietta Street London in 1861, he spent the rest of his life with his parents. Henreitta Street was only a few streets away from where his brother James was working for the Ditchfields.
William died in the March quarter of 1921 age 74. He remained a bachelor
In James's Will of 1910 he left William £10 (£823.54) payable directly and a yearly allowance of £50 (£4,117.71) payable in weekly installments until his death. Comparison figure approximate.

Henry Bailey (1849)
When Henry left school at the age of 13 he was a farm labourer living with his parents at East Tuddenham Norfolk. It could be that James had been writing home telling his folks about his better way of live, as sometime after 1861 Henry had moved to London and was working in the household of the Right Honourable Joseph Alfred Hardcastle MP, an English Liberal politician who sat in the House of Commons. The address was 54 Queens Gate Terrace Kensington and Henry was a general servant.
In the December quarter of 1874 Henry married Annie Wilcocks at Guildford. No earlier records of an Annie Wilcock can be found but there is an Amelia Ann Wilcocks which seems to be the same person. She was the daughter of Francis Willcocks a Builder's Clerk and his wife Martha née Rogers of Limehouse London.
It was not long after his marriage that Henry would take the step of becoming independent for in 1881 he was the Landlord of the Bulls Head Tavern at 37 Denmark Hill, Camberwell. It is very likely James would have helped in some way and possibly financially as the tavern/hotel was quite a success for at this time he was employing two servants and a child nurse to look after his three children plus a barman who was living on the premises. Staying with them was Charles Smith a Band Sergt 73rd Regt (Army) and Amelia Smith described as Henry's brother and sister in-law. Although at this time it is not clear how they relate.
In 1882 Henry and Annie had another son which they named Frederick but it was not long after this that tragedy struck for in the December quarter of 1884 Annie died aged just 35 leaving Henry with four young children.
By 1891 Henry had moved to the Royal Navy Tavern at 53 Salmon Lane, Limestone, London and it is noted that he had a new wife Adelaide age 28. No record of this marriage has been found to-date but sometime after 1892 Henry must have died as in 1898 when James instructed his Will he referred to Henry as his late brother. No record of Henry or Adelaide has been found in the 1901 census. The only record that seems likely and is a close match to Henry's age (46) is in the March quarter of 1896 at St Georges Hanover Square.
We do know that baby Frederick had been brought back to Mattishall to live with his grandparents William and Sarah Bailey at Kensington House. However Frederick died on Oct 14th 1901 age 19 and is buried with his grandparents in their private plot at St Peters Churchyard , Mattishall Burgh.
In James's Will of 1910 he was unable to leave anything to Henry as he had been declared deceased but as was the custom in those times the legacy would be transfered to the eldest son who was Charles Dunthorne Bailey. Charles received a £50 lump sum (£4,117.71) and a yearly allowance of £100 (£8,235.42) payable in weekly instalments until his death. Comparison figure approximate.

Mary Bailey (1851)
Mary also went to London seeking work, drawn we would assume by James and Henry. It is not known where she was in 1871 but by the March quarter of 1773 Mary married George Curtis at St Pancras. George was the son of Luke Curtis a Beer House Keeper of Wroughton, Swindon, Whiltshire and his wife Martha née Dunn
In 1881 George was the landlord of the Manor Hotel, Felixstowe Suffolk, although they were still in Kensington in 1879 as their daughter Alice Mary was born there. Very soon after taking over the Manor a report in the Ipswich Journal on August 5th in 1882 shows George applied to have the licence transferred from the Manor Hotel to a new house, about to be built, adjoining Sea Road, owned by George Tomline, which will be called ‘The Curtis Hotel’ and will be used as an Inn, Alehouse or Victualling House. However this appears not to have taken place for in 1891 the family are found staying with James’s parents at Kensington House, Mattishall where the family settled. On the 14th February 1898 George joined the Mattishall Parish Council. The Chairman at the time was William Mann Horne. George's last meeting was on the 15th April 1919, there is no mention in the minutes of him resigning or if he was not re-elected.
George Cutis in the 1911 census was now a 58 year old farmer and Mary according to the census had given birth to eleven children five of which had died. With them were two daughters Alice Mary (single) who was working on the farm as a dairy worker and Catherine Sarah who had married William Marshall Critoph in 1899, son of William Critoph miller of Yaxham and sister to May Farrow née Critoph who was living adjacent to Kensington House on Dereham Road. May's husband A. J. Farrow (threshing & steam engine owner) was one of the largest employers of Mattishall (LINK). James's brother (William age 65) was living with them together with James's nephew Charles Dunthorne Bailey (Henry's son) age 34 and living on private means.
Mary and George's son Edward George Curtis was killed in action in the first world war and is named on the Mattishall War Memorial (LINK)
Mary died age 84 on December 7th 1935 at East Dereham. George died March 16th 1925 at Great Yarmouth.
In James's Will of 1910 he left Mary £500. In todays money (2015) this would equate to £41,177.08. Comparison figure approximate.
James also instructed that the annual allowance left to Charles Dunthorne Bailey be administered by Mary.

William Bailey & Sarah née Dunthorne (James's parents)
As we see above George and Robert had been drawn to North Yorkshire in the mid to late 1850's as ironstone mining had become very lucrative business offering full employment. The prospect of a better life and the draw of their two sons must of been to much to resist for William and Sarah together with young William, Frederick and Alice Dunthorne packed their belongings and set about the journey of over 200 miles to be with their two son who seemed to have settled there.
A blow to the family came on October 22nd 1870 when their daughter Alice Dunthorne Bailey died age just 9, she was buried in St Mary's Churchyard at Eston. Whether this was anything to do with their decision but by 1881 we find them back at Mattishall where it appears James had purchased a farm on the west-side of the village located on the Dereham Road. It is unsure if this was for the purpose of James as a county retreat or for his parents but from then on in, it was to be the home of William and Sarah. Putting aside the rumors of parentage it appears James had set his 60 year old father up with his own land for he was now recorded as 'Farmer of 31 acres'. A dream comes true for him as William had been an agricultural labourer for so many years, Sarah age 64 was recorded as 'farmer’s wife' living with them was James's brother William age 33, 'farmers son'. It is with no surprise that the property would become known as Kensington House/Farm and is still there today.
As mentioned above in 1891 James's sister, husband and family had moved in with them and were still there in 1901 where William (James's father) was still living at Kensington House listed as an 81 year old widower and retired farmer. Mary's husband George Curtis is recorded as Head and Farmer, employer with James's brother (William age 54) farmer's son, employed at home.
James's mother, Sarah died in 1891 and on the 10th June 1894 James Bailey donated a new organ to All Saints Church, Mattishall, dedicated to the memory of his mother. There is a brass plaque on the organ case recording this gift. By this time James was easing himself out of the hotel business and had sold the Bailey which could account for his generosity. He did not honour William Bailey in a similar way.
The rector at the time was the Rev Andrew Johnston Hunter (Aug 15, 1844) who was rector of All Saints Church from 1885-1896. Rev Hunter lived at Mattishall Hall, South Green were in 1891 he was recorded aged 46 and Vicar of Mattishall (Em'er). With him was his wife Agnes Blanch née Phillips age 45, their 9 year old daughter Elinor and five members of staff.
Elinor never married and lived at the Hall for many years. She was a well known figure in the area often seen walking her family of stray dogs in the village. She was secretary to the Dereham branch of the R.S.P.C.A. for over 43 years

To the Glory of God
and in the Memory of his Mother
this Organ is given to the Church of
All Saints Mattishall
by James Bailey
June XI MDCCCXCIV
(10th June 1894)

This page is still under construction

Timeline:
The name Bailey is shown as it was transcribed on the records

James's parents marriage:
1840:
Jun 08 – Marriage at St Peters Church Mattishall Burgh – Entry 4
William Baley a Bachelor age 20 and a Labourer married Sarah Dunthorne a Spinster – both made their mark
Fathers: Peter Baley a Labourer and Henry Dunthorne a Farmer
Witness: John Baley (signed) and Maria Bultitude made her mark

James's birth record:
1840: Birth record – James Bailey at Mitford – Dec quarter (13 210)

1841: Census – Low Street Mattishall Burgh
Mary Dunthorne – age 60 – Farmer
Sarah Bailey – age 25
George Dunthorne – age 5
James Bailey – age 7months

Meanwhile Sarah's husband William was not ling with them, he was a few doors away!
1841:
Census - Low Street Mattishall Burgh
William Bayley an agricultural Labourer age 20 was living with John Gedge a shoemaker age 75 a few properties up

James's Baptism:
1843:
Mar 12 – Baptism at All Saints Church Mattishall – Entry 130
James Bailey son of William Bailey a Labourer and his wife Sarah Dunthorn

James parents were here:- Recorded as Borley:
1851: Census - Badley Moor, Mattishall
William Bailey – Head – age 30 - Ag Labourer – Mattishall Burgh
Sarah Bailey – Wife – age 35 Mattishall
Robert Bailey – Son – age 7 – Mattishall
William Bailey – Son – age 5 – Mattishall
Infant Bailey – Dau – age 5 – Mattishall

Meanwhile James was here:
1851: Census - North Tuddenham
James Cobb - Head - age 32 1819 - Farmer - Hardingham, Norfolk
Ann Cobb - Wife - age 22 1829 - Southburgh, Norfolk
James Baley - Servant - age 10 1841 - Far Lab - Mattishall, Norfolk

James’s grandmother dies:
1858: May 18th – Burail at St Peters Church Mattishall Burgh – Entry 137
Mary Dunthorn age 81 (1777)

1861: Census - 12, Taviton Street, St Pancras, Pancras, London
Eliza Ann Ditchfield - Wife - Married - age 48 1813 - Liverpool, Lancashire
Arthur Ditchfield - Son - age 13 1848 - Student - London, Middlesex
James Bailey - Servant - Unmarried - age 20 1841- General Servant - Mattishall, Norfolk
Charlotte Tiver - Servant - Unmarried - age 39 1822 - General Servant - North Petherton, Somerset
Mary Foster - Servant - Unmarried - age 39 1822 - General Servant - Barnet, Hertfordshire

James and Catherine's wedding:
1869:
April 29 – At the Parish Church St George Hanover Square – Entry 182
James Bailey a Bachelor and Lodging House Keeper of Hayes Mews London
Catherine Smith a Spinster of Piccadilly London
Father’s: William Bailey a Miner & John Smith a Blacksmith
Witness J. James Smith and Emily Leticia Saint

1871: Census – 7 St George Terrace Kensington
James Bailey - Head - age 30 - Lodging House Keeper – Mattishall Burgh, Norfolk
Catherine Bailey - Wife - age 31 – Benson, Oxfordshire
Alice K N Bailey - Dau - age 1 - Kensington
Sarah Edwards - Servant - age 19 (1852) - Housemaid - Mattishall Burgh, Norfolk
Sophia Howard - Servant - age 17 - Nursemaid –
All the houses at St George Terrace were leased – the properties were demolished about 1907

1871-1881: (precise date unknown) Purchased land and farmhouse on the westside of Mattishall, Norfolk on Dereham road which he called 'Kensington House/Farm'

Bailey Hotel - Developer: H B Alexander & Charles Aldin
1874: - Started building
1876: - Construction finish - Opened 1876
1881: - The nine stables demolished and replaced by a garden & extensions on the site that is today occupied by the Bombay Brasserie.
1883: - New bedrooms were installed
1877: - Bailey extended Bailey’s Hotel along Courtfield Road
1890: - New elevator and electric lights in all rooms were installed. By then, the Hotel had been enlarged to over 300 rooms and James Bailey himself lived in the Hotel. Also resident in the Hotel were approximately thirty-five of the staff members.
1894: - James Bailey began a gradual exit from the Hotel business. He sold both of his hotels to Spiers and Pond Limited, but remained as Managing Director until I8??. The reason for this change was his growing official career.

Other Hotels Owned
????: - Harrington Hotel, 25 Gloucester Road (not sure of date)
1886: - South Kensington Hotel, Queensgate Terrace - Aldin (builder) had also been financially involved.

1878 - 1894: - James was active as a Kensington vestryman - In the early years of his residence in London he was elected to a seat on the Kensington Vestry by the ratepayers of the ward of Holy Trinity, Brompton, in 1878, and continued to occupy that position until 1894, when he resigned the office as he contemplated seeking a seat in Parliament. While as churchwarden at Kensington he worked hard, and with success, to extinguish the debt which remained on the re-building of the Parish Church (St. Mary Abbots), and on his retirement was presented with a testimonial from the Kensington Vestry, gratefully acknowledging the service he had rendered.

1881: Census – Baileys Hotel Kensington
James Bailey – Head – age 40 - Hotel Keeper – recorded as ‘Maffis Hill, Norfolk’
Katherine Bailey – Wife – age 40 - Benson, Oxfordshire
Alice K N Bailey – Dau - age 11 – Scholar - Kensington, Middlesex
Agusta D Bailey – Dau – age 8 – Scholar - Kensington, Middlesex
Percy J Bailey – Son – age 7 – Scholar - Kensington, Middlesex
Marie E Bailey – Dau – age 6 – Scholar - Kensington, Middlesex
Frederick G G Bailey – Son – age 1 - S Kensington, Middlesex
Elizabeth Smith – Mother in L – Widow – age 66 (1815) - Private Means - Wootton Bassett, Wiltshire
Staying at the hotel were very prominent people together with their staff and ladies in waiting.

1883: - James Bailey was one of the founders of the Constitutional Club in Northumberland Avenue

1889: - James Bailey was a Director of 'Harrod’s Stores' Limited from the incorporation of the company in November 1889, until his death in October 1910. He attended his last Board meeting at Harrods on 5 October 1910, a few days before his death. The flotation of Harrod’s Stores Limited in 1889, when C. D. Harrod retired and sold his business, was organized by the entrepreneur Edgar Cohen. We assume Cohen selected the members of the Board, including James Bailey and the Chairman, Alfred Newton. A few years later Cohen was involved in the flotation of 'D. H. Evans' in Oxford Street, later to become 'The House of Frazer' and Bailey and Newton became directors of that company too.At Harrods I it is thought James Bailey’s experience as a successful hotelier would have been useful, as well as his local knowledge as a resident of the area - Information kindly supplied by Mr. Sebastian Wormell - Harrods Archivist. (LINK)

1891: Census - 33 Harrington Gardens, Kensington, London - Now the home of The Bentley Hotel
James Bailey - Head - age 50 1841 - Hotel Proprietor - Mattishall, Norfolk
Catherine Bailey - Wife - age 50 1841 - Benson, Oxfordshire
Alice Bailey - Dau - Single age 21 1870 - Kensington, Middlesex
Augusta Bailey - Dau age 18 1873 - Kensington, Middlesex
Percy Bailey - Son - age 17 1874 - Scholar Kensington, Middlesex
Frederick Bailey - Son - age 11 1880 - Scholar Kensington, Middlesex
Sidney Bailey - Son - age 8 1883 - Scholar - Kensington, Middlesex
Elizabeth Chapman - Servant - Single - age 33 1858 - Cook - Dennington, Suffolk
Sarah Fawker - Servant - Single - age 44 1847 - Housemaid - South Luffenham, Rutland
Louisa Taylor - Servant - Single - age 19 1872 - Housemaid - Nursling, Hampshire
Alice Hollands - Servant - Single - age 19 1872 – Kitchen maid - Sundridge, Kent
Alice Scolding - Servant - Single - age 24 1867 - Nurse - Eye, Suffolk
Albert Pickett - Servant - Single - age 21 1870 - Footman - Kensington, Middlesex

James’s mother dies: 19th May 1891:
1891: May 23 - Burial at St Peters Church Mattishall Burgh – Entry 228
Sarah Bailey age 76 - See headstone memorial incription at 1901 (death of husband William)

James's wife Catherine died aged just 43:
1892:
Death record – Catherine Bailey at Kensington – Sep quarter (1a 62) age 43

1894: - On the Board of Messrs. D.H. Evans Ltd:
In April 1894, having traded successfully for fifteen years as D H Evans, Dan Harries Evans announced the creation of a limited liability company, D H Evans & Co Ltd. The new company had a capital of GBP202,000. Evans retained a majority holding and the remaining shares, offered to staff and customers, were subscribed several times over. Alfred James Newton, chairman of Harrod's Stores Ltd, department store, Knightsbridge, London, was appointed chairman of the new company, assisted by James Bailey, James Boyton, and Richard Burbidge, who were later joined by Edgar Cohen and William Mendel as directors. Evans was appointed managing director, at a salary of GBP750 per annum, and attended board meetings as an observer.

1894: James Bailey donated a new organ at All Saints Church, Mattishall, Norfolk in his mother's memory

1895: May 14 - James Bailey was elected as a Member of Parliament for the Walworth division of Newington and remained so until 1906. Entered the House of Commons on 13 July 1895- General election, Left the House of Commons on 8 January 1906 - General election. During the eleven years he sat at Westminster he made many friends. He was one of the Kitchen Committee of the House of Commons and it is no exaggeration that he saved the Committee a large sum of money, and placed the Commissariat upon solid and firm business lines.
The Walworth Constituency was abolished in 1918

1895: - James Bailey had the position of Justice of the Peace in Essex

Together with the following:-
Deputy Lieutenant for Norfolk - date unknown
Chairman of the Founder’s Shares Company, Ltd.
For some years he had been a governor of Newport Grammar School.

James Bailey remarries to Elizabeth Fass:
1896:
- Chelmsford Chronicle 05 June 1896
Mr James Bailey MP for Walworth, 33 Harrington – Gardens Shortgrove Saffron Walden, was married by special licence at half - past eleven on Tuesday at the Private Chapel of Deanery, Worchester, to Miss Elizabeth Sophy Fass, second daughter of Mr A Fass of 32 Queens Gate Gardens. The Dean of Worchester officiated, and the bride was given away by her father. There were no bridesmaids. The newly married pair left Worchester in the afternoon for Switzerland where the honeymoon will be spent.

Newspaper article - date unknown: James Bailey was President of the Saffron Walden District Conservative Association he worked hard for the Conservative and Unionist cause in the division, particularly at the last election, when the seat was won for the first time by the Unionist party. It was largely through his instrumentality that the Saffron Walden Habitation of the Primrose League was resuscitated about three years ago - He was Ruling Councillor of the Habitation from that time until last year, when he retired from the office and was succeeded by Colonel Proby, M.P., Lady Bailey still retaining the office of Dame President

1901: Census - 1, Princes Gate, London, St Margaret and St John, St George Hanover Square
James Bailey - Head - age 60 1841- M P for Walworth D L For Norfolk J P For Essex - Mattishall, Norfolk
Elizabeth Bailey - Wife - age 35 1866 – South Africa
Marie Bailey - Dau - Single - age 25 1876 - Kensington, Middlesex
Louis Ingham - Servant - Single - age 28 1873 - Butler Domestic - Cambridgeshire
Charles Scutter - Servant - Single - age 25 1876 - Footman Domestic - Hampstead, Middlesex
Thomas Walker - Servant - Single - age 19 1882 - Second Footman Domestic - Battersea, Middlesex
Alice Wyatt - Servant - Single - age 38 1863 - Cook Domestic - Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire
Jane Clark - Servant - Single - age 20 1881 - Kitchenmaid Domestic - Bermondsey, Surrey
Ada Searle - Servant - Single - age 25 1876 - Housemaid Domestic - Putney, Surrey
Florence Green - Servant - Single - age 29 1872 - Ladys Maid Domestic - Feltham, Surrey
Georgina Fowlie - Servant - Single - age 28 1873 - Ladys Maid Domestic - Scotland
Edith Smith - Servant - Single - age 25 1876 - 2nd Housemaid Domestic - Eltham, Kent
Florence Crowther - Servant - Single - age 20 1881 - 3rd Housemaid Domestic - Vauxhall, Surrey
Nellie Moore - Servant - Single - age 16 1885 - Scullery Maid Domestic - Kensington, Middlesex

James’s father dies: 18th Septmember 1901:
1901: Sep 22 – Burial at St Peters Church Mattishall Burgh – Entry 258
William Bailey age 83

Mattishall Burgh churchyard headstone:
Gothic shaped top, floral cartouche and side by side inscription with lead infilled lettering (some missing).
Semi-circular top. In a triple width chain-link surround.

In Memory of SARAH the beloved wife of
WILLIAM BAILEY
Who died May 19th 1891 aged 76 years

WILLIAM the beloved husband of
SARAH BAILEY
who died Sep 18th 1901 aged 82 years

Come unto me ye weary and I will give you rest

 

1904: - James Bailey took over as tennant to 'Lofts Hall' Elmdon Saffron Walden, Essex
Tenants of Loft Hall - Elmdon: Continuity and Change in a North-West Essex Village, 1861-1964
As we saw in chapter 3 Lofts Hall was let to tenants from 1905 until the sale of the estate. As befitted the occupants of such a large house, the tenants were wealthy, far wealthier indeed than the Squire, who was suffering at the time from a reduced rent roll and who had to provide for five sisters. We do not know whether the Squire and his tenants were always on good terms, but clearly there were times when the latter saw their roll in the village as very similar to his. For instance, within a year of their arrival Sir James Bailey and his daughter presented Elmdon with a Reading Room, a small brick building centrally situated across the village green from the church, where the girls could attend cookery, needlework and laundry glasses, while the boys for a fee of 2d played billiards and held boxing contests ‘with a proper ring, and gloves – we could do what we liked in there’. Some Elmdomers remembered that Sir James would have the children up to the Hall and give each of them a jug of broth, with plenty of meat in it. He also put on a fate one year, with an exhibition of garden produce, and later visited Ted Gamgee’s plot, commenting on the neatness of his rows lettuces, onions and beetroot, Lady Bailey, like the Squire would visit Wenden Lofts school, and give the children presents. But not all actions of the Bailey’s were well received. Great opposition was aroused when Lady Bailey tried to close the footpath alongside the avenue leading up to the Hall, and the villages refused to sign the petition for closure which was presented to them. There is in fact, no reason to believe that the presence of the Bailey’s lessened the Squires authority in the eyes of the village. Sir James died in 1910 whilst having a Turkish bath in London, and his lease ran out two years later. The next tenants who used the Hall largely for shooting parties, were Americans, and although they must have had considerable effect on the prosperity of the tenants of the Wilkes Arms, whom they used as caterers, they did not participate in village affairs as the Bailey’s had done.

1905: - James Bailey was Knighted on Monday 18th December 1905 - at Buckingham Palace by King Edward VII (Albert Edward 9th November 1841 - 6th May 1910) - Notes: The King was this day pleased to confer the honour of Knighthood upon the under mentioned Gentleman at Buckingham Palace: James Bailey, Esq, MP. 1 Princes-gate, S.W. - The foregoing honour takes effect as fron the 9th November 1905.

1909: - The Stage Year Book - Music Hall Artists Railway Association.
Founded in 1897 - 28, Wellington Street, Strand, London, W.C. The total number of members in this Association is 7,561, calculated to December 31.
President, W. H. Clemart; Vice-Presidents, Sir James Bailey, Albert Le Fre, Fred W. Millis ; Hon. Trustees, J. W. Cragg, Joe Elvin, Paul Martinetti; Hon. Treasurer, Douglas White.

Home Addresses
1841: - Mary Dunthorns Farm, Low Road, Mattishall Burgh
1851: -
James Cobbs Farm, Norwich Road, North Tuddenham, Norfolk
1861:
- 12, Taviton Street, St Pancras
1869: - Hay's Mews London (this could have been just for the purpose of his marriage)
1871: - 7 St George's Terrace Kensington
Unknown: - Somewhere about this time the Harrington Hotel, 25 Gloucester Road
1881: - Bailey Hotel, 140 Gloucester Road Kensington

1891: - 33 Harrington Gardens, Kensington
1892:
- Quendon Hall, Saffron Walson district, James took Quendon Hall on a short lease from the late Lieut-Colonel Cranmer Byng.
1895: - Shortgrove, Newport, from Lord Cardross, an estate of 700 acres. lived there about 6 years, sold in 1901 to Sir Carl Meyer.
1901: - 1, Princes Gate, London, St Margaret and St John, St George Hanover Square
1904: - Lofts Hall from Mr J.F. Wilkes - During his stay at Shortgrove, Sir James did a lot of good for the people of Newport. He first bought the Old Grammar School for a Parish Hall and Reading Room, but this was not considered suitable and he then purchased the ground for the present Parish Hall and Reading Room, and when the people of Newport were unable to raise sufficient money for the erection of the building he again came to the rescue, finished it off, and practically gave it to the place.
1910: - 58 Rutland Gate, London (London residence)

This page is still under construction

James's Death & Press Release/Obituary

1910: Oct 12 - Sir James Bailey died at his London home, 58 Rutland Gate, leaving an estate valued at £245,000. Which in todays money (2015) equates to £26,053,331.85

Newspaper article:
58 Rutland Gate, London - ‘It is with regret that we have to record the death of Sir James Bailey, which occurred somewhat suddenly on Tuesday from heart failure at his London residence, 58, Rutland Gate. Sir James had not been in good health for a long time past, and had had one or two severe attacks of illness, but during the last few weeks his condition had greatly improved and he appeared to his friends to have taken a new lease of life. He and Lady Bailey had lately been staying at their country residence, Lofts Hall, Elmdon, and Sir James left there on Tuesday morning to stay in London for the night, for the purpose of saying good-bye to his eldest son, Major Percy Bailey, D.S.O., who was leaving England on Wednesday with his Regiment, the 12th Lancers, for South Africa. Sir James then appeared so much better that the news that evening of his sudden death came as a painful shock to his many friends in the Saffron Walden district, for he was beloved by everybody who knew him, and all felt that they had lost a personal friend.

PRESS RELEASE
‘It is with regret that we have to record the death of Sir James Bailey, which occurred somewhat suddenly on Tuesday from heart failure at his London residence, 58, Rutland Gate. Sir James had not been in good health for a long time past, and had had one or two severe attacks of illness, but during the last few weeks his condition had greatly improved and he appeared to his friends to have taken a new lease of life. He and Lady Bailey had lately been staying at their country residence, Lofts Hall, Elmdon, and Sir James left there on Tuesday morning to stay in London for the night, for the purpose of saying good-bye to his eldest son, Major Percy Bailey, D.S.O., who was leaving England on Wednesday with his Regiment, the 12th Lancers, for South Africa. Sir James then appeared so much better that the news that evening of his sudden death came as a painful shock to his many friends in the Saffron Walden district, for he was beloved by everybody who knew him, and all felt that they had lost a personal friend.

Sir James was born on November 10th 1840, was the son of Mr William Bailey, of Kensington House, Mattishall, Norfolk, and was educated at Dereham Grammar School. He was a Justice of the Peace for Essex, Deputy-Lieutenant for his native county of Norfolk, and was one of the original founders of the Constitutional Club in Northumberland Avenue, and at the time of his death was still a member of the Committee. His hard work and business acumen were undoubtedly the means of greatly assisting to make that Institution successful. He was elected a Member of Parliament for Walworth (Newington division) as a Conservative in 1895, when his opponents were Colonel J.C. Beade, Gladstonian Liberal, and Sir George Lansbury, Socialist, and he continued to represent that constituency until 1906. During the eleven years he sat at Westminster he made many friends. He was one of the Kitchen Committee of the House of Commons and it is no exaggeration that he saved the Committee a large sum of money, and placed the Commissariat upon solid and firm business lines. He received the honour of Knighthood in 1905. His constituents in Walworth will always have reason to be grateful for the interest he showed in their welfare, and it was to him that they are indebted for the purchase of the open space in East-street through his payment of a large sum in addition to the amount offered by the London County Council, which was considerably below what would have been accepted. Sir James was well known in London and was associated with several large enterprises. He was the founder of Bailey’s Hotel, Kensington, was Chairman of the Founder’s Shares Company, Ltd., and was on the Board of Messrs. D.H. Evans Ltd., and Messrs. Harrods Stores, Ltd. In the early years of his residence in London he was elected to a seat on the Kensington Vestry by the ratepayers of the ward of Holy Trinity, Brompton, in 1878, and continued to occupy that position until 1894, when he resigned the office as he contemplated seeking a seat in Parliament. While as churchwarden at Kensington he worked hard, and with success, to extinguish the debt which remained on the re-building of the Parish Church (St. Mary Abbots), and on his retirement was presented with a testimonial from the Kensington Vestry, gratefully acknowledging the service he had rendered. Sir James first came into residence in the Saffron Walson district in 1892, when he took Quendon Hall on a short lease from the late Lieut-Colonel Cranmer Byng. He purchased Shortgrove, Newport, in 1895, from Lord Cardross, and after living there …? years, sold the estate in 1901 to Sir Carl Meyer, and took Lofts Hall from Mr J.F. Wilkes, and went to reside there in 1904. During his stay at Shortgrove, Sir James did a lot of good for the people of Newport. He first bought the Old Grammar School for a Parish Hall and Reading Room, but this was not considered suitable and he then purchased the ground for the present Parish Hall and Reading Room, and when the people of Newport were unable to raise sufficient money for the erection of the building he again came to the rescue, finished it off, and practically gave it to the place. Since living at Lofts Hall he has done much to improve that charming old country residence and it was largely through his instrumentality that a Parish Hall and Reading Room were provided for the parish of Elmdon. For some years he had been a governor of Newport Grammar School, and as President of the Saffron Walden District Conservative Association he worked hard for the Conservative and Unionist cause in the division, particularly at the last election, when the seat was won for the first time by the Unionist party. It was largely through his instrumentality that the Saffron Walden Habitation of the Primrose League was resuscitated about three years ago, and he was Ruling Councillor of the Habitation from that time until last year, when he retired from the office and was succeeded by Colonel Proby, M.P., Lady Bailey still retaining the office of Dame President………… Sir James Bailey was twice married. A family of three sons and three daughters were born to him. The eldest of his sons, Major Percy James Bailey, served in the late war in South Africa, where he was severely wounded, and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order. His second son, Lieut. F.G. Bailey, went out to South Africa as a Yeoman, and was promoted by Lord Roberts to a Commission in the Royal Horse Artillery; and his third son, Lieut. Sidney R. Bailey, is Gunnery Inspector in the Royal Navy at Portsmouth. The three daughters are all married.’

‘The funeral of Sir James Bailey, of Lofts Hall and 58, Rutland Gate, S.W., took place at mid-day on Friday at Wenden Lofts Church, situated in Lofts Hall Park, hard by the deceased’s country home…………..At the same hour as the funeral at Wenden Lofts a memoral service was held at All Saints’ Church. Ennismore Gardens, London.’

1916: - Elizabeth Bailey née Fass remarried in 1916 to Francis Saville Harry Judd, JP for Essex - Sep quarter at Saffron W – (4a 1567)
Born Sep 06 1855 son of John Phillipps Judd and his wife Frances Anna Scott

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Like BAILEYS Irish Cream - then did you know?

The drink was created by Gilbeys of Ireland.
Baileys was a fictional name, there was no Mr or Mrs Bailey they wanted a name that was Irish, but not ‘show' Irish. The name Bailey was a colorful invention cooked up by the multinational drinks group, in a London office overlooking the Bailey Hotel. It was introduced to the international market as the first Irish Cream in 1974.

"The name of this alcoholic drink was inspired by the Millennium Bailey's Hotel, a building placed in the 140 Gloucester Road, Kensington. It was established in 1876 and it took its name after its owner, the Member of Parliament Sir James Bailey".

 

This page is still under construction

More on James's Children:
My thanks to Catherine Kirkwood née Bailey for supplying a lot of the information and structure on James's children.

01 - ALICE KATE NOTLEY BAILEY 

Alice was born in 1870.

Alice married Walter Bernard Hopkins (1863) on Apr 29th 1891 at Kensington (Jun quarter -1a 225).
Alice and Walter had one child:

[1] Catherine Maude Hopkins (1892)
1892: Dec 08 - Baptism record at St Jude, South Kensington - Entry 240
Catherine Maude Hopkins daughter of Walter Bernard Hopkins a Civil Engineer and his wife Alice Kate Notley of 57 Nevern Sqr Earls Court - Ceremony performed by: E. A. Eardley-Wilmot Vicar
Catherine married Lieut. Valentine Leslie Douglas Uzielli (1888) of Kensington
Valentine was killed in action on the 21st Jul 1917
Catherine never remarried, she died in the Mar quater of 1964 at Kensington age 74

 
Name; Valentine Leslie Douglas Uzielli - age 29
Rank: Lieutenant
Service No:  
Date of Death: 21/07/1917
Regiment/Service: Royal Field Artillery
Cemetery Link: COXYDE MILITARY CEMETERY
Additional Information: Son of Douglas Uzielli; husband of Catherine Uzielli, of 34, Warwick Gardens, West Kensington, London
Link: War Graves Reference Page

1901: Census - 57 Nevern Square, Kensington
Walter Hopkins - Head
Alice Hopkins - Wife
Catherine Hopkins - Dau - age 8
Servants x 4

Obituary Notice: WALTER BERNARD HOPKINS was born on the 19th July, 1863, and died on the 14th April, 1934. He was apprenticed to his father, the late Mr. G. D. Hopkins, a civil engineer, for five years, spending a year of this period as a resident engineer on the Ramsey- Somersham Railway. From 1887 to 1896 he was em- ployed under his father on the construction of the East and West Yorkshire Union Railways and of various tramway systems in London. In 1896 he became a partner in his father's business. He was subsequently responsible for the plans of numerous electric tramway systems, including the Bradford-Leeds, Aldershot- Farnborough, Dundee-Broughty Ferry, Camborne- Redruth, Glossop, and Bath. At a later date he was engaged on engineering work in connection with the Maidstone-Ashford Railway. In addition, he promoted and successfully carried through the electric lighting schemes of several towns. A director for some years of Edmundsons' Electricity Corporation, the Folkestone Electricity Supply Co., and the Lancashire Electric Power Co., he also served as consulting engineer to Messrs. Siemens Brothers, for whom he undertook a world tour in 1918-19. He was elected a Member of the Institution in 1903.


Alice died on Mar 19th 1965 at Surry South West, Mar quarter (5g 1052) aged 95. Walter died in the Jun quarter (Apr 14th) of 1934 at Kensington (1a 105) age 70.

02 - AUGUSTA DUNTHORNE BAILEY 

Augusta was born in 1872.

Augusta married Vivian Nickalls (1871) in the Mar quarter of 1898 at St George’s Hanover Square (1a 639).
Augusta and Vivian had three children:

[1] Unknown daughter (1899-1899)
[2] Barbara Marie Nickalls (1901-1942) Barbara remained single
[3] Nancy Augusta Nickalls (1903-1984) - married John Grey in 1926 and had two sons. John E (1929) & William (1930)
Nancy Augusta Nickalls married John Grey, on Oct 06 1926.

John Grey was born on 8 July 1899.1 He was the son of Egerton Spencer Grey and Ethel Harriet Wigan. He married Nancy Augusta Nickalls, daughter of Vivian Nickalls, on 6 October 1926. He died in 1979.
He was educated at Winchester College, Winchester, Hampshire, England. He gained the rank of 2nd Lieutenant in the service of the Rifle Brigade. He fought in the First World War. He graduated with a AADip. He was invested as a Fellow, Royal Institute of British Architects (F.R.I.B.A.). He was invested as a Fellow, Royal Society of Art (F.R.S.A.).

VIVIAN NICKALLS (1871-1947) was a British rower who won the Wingfield Sculls three times and the Diamond Challenge Sculls at Henley Royal Regatta in 1891. Nickalls was born at Farningham, Kent, the son of Tom Nickalls and his wife Emily Quihampton. He was baptized on April 07 1872. His father was a stockjobber on the London Stock Exchange with a particular expertise in investing in American railroads. Nickalls was one of twelve children, of whom his brother Guy Nickalls was also a successful oarsman. Nickalls was educated at Magdalen College, Oxford and rowed with hs brother in the 1891 Boat Race. He won the Diamond Challenge Sculls at Henley in 1891 and the Wingfield Sculls in 1892 and 1894 while at Oxford. He joined London Rowing Club and with his brother he won the Silver Goblets at Henley in 1894, 1895 and 1896. and won the Wingfield Sculls again in 1895. Nickalls married in 1898. His sister Florence married William Adolf Baillie Grohman an Anglo-Austrian author. Nickalls went into his father's stockbroking business. The family had connections and property in the United States, and in 1914 Nickalls went to America to coach at the University of Pennsylvania. On arrival he was quoted as saying that he did not propose to use or teach the English stroke, declaring that he considered the way they row at Oxford and Cambridge and the English rowing system in general as "very bad." After the outbreak of World War I he resigned to join the army. He described his wartime experiences in Oars, Wars and Horses published by Hurst & Blackett in 1932. He lived at The High House, Newbury, Berkshire.

Augusta died in the Jun quarter of 1949 at Newbury (6a 57) age 76 and Vivain died in the Dec quarter of 1947 at Reading (6a 84) age 76

03 - LIEUT-COLONEL PERCY JAMES BAILEY DSO,OBE

Percy was born on December 2nd 1873.

Percy married Dorothy Jessica Bowles (1885) on Dec 14th 1907 at St George’s Hanover Square (1a 933)
Dorothy was the daughter of Thomas Gibson Bowles - Dorothy Jessica Bowles is the daughter of Thomas Gibson Bowles. She married Colonel Percy Bailey, son of Sir James Bailey.
Percy and Dorothy had children:

[1] Richard James Bailey (1908-1969) Richard was a Commander in the Royal Navy. He married Rosemary Ann Ogilvy Freeman-Mitford (1911-2005).

Commander Richard James Bailey is the son of Colonel Percy Bailey and Dorothy Jessica Bowles. He married Rosemary Ann Freeman-Mitford, daughter of Major Hon. Clement Bertram Ogilvy Freeman-Mitford and Lady Helen Alice Wyllington Ogilvy, on 29 October 1932.
He gained the rank of Commander in the service of the Royal Navy.

Rosemary Ann Ogilvy Bailey (nee Freeman-Mitford), who died at Burford, Oxfordshire, 22 October, 2005, aged 95, was a scion of the Barons Redesdale. She was born in 1911, a daughter of Major the Hon Clement Bertram Ogilvy Freeman-Mitford, DSO, eldest son and heir of the 1st Baron, (1876-1915), by his wife the former Lady Helen Alice Willington Ogilvy (d. 1973), daughter of the 11th Earl of Airlie; married 1932, Cdr Richard James (Dick) Bailey, OBE, RN (who d. 1969), by whom she had issue; 2 sons, Richard and Michael (who both predeceased her); & 4 daughters, Clementine, Penelope, Lavinia & Annabel; Funeral at St John the Baptist Church, Burford, 1 Nov, 2006

[2] Anthony Bailey (1910-1941) Anthony married Desiree Dorothy Dickinson (1914-2005) Anthony was a test pilot and was killed in a flying accident in 1941 - Douglas Macauley and his observer, Sub-Lieutenant Anothony Bailey, were killed as Macauley dived his Stringbag to steeply at a target and the wings were torn off. Stringfish is a nickname for The Fairey Swordfish a biplane torpedo bomber designed by the Fairey Aviation Company, used by the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy during World War II.

[3] Christopher Sidney Bailey (1915-1942) Christopher was a Captain in the Royal Armoured Corps, 4th Queens Hussars Special Air Service. He was killed in action on Sep 15th 1942.

 
Name; Christopher Sidney Bailey - age 26
Rank: Captain
Service No: 141129
Date of Death: 15/09/1942
Regiment/Service: Royal Armoured Corps
4th Queen's Own Hussars attd. 'L' Det., Special Air Service Bde
Cemetery Link: ALAMEIN MEMORIAL
Additional Information: Son of Col. Percy James Bailey, D.S.O., O.B.E., and Dorothy Jessica Bailey, of Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire.
Link: War Graves Reference Page

[4] Timothy Bailey (1918-1986) - No further information

Percy James Bailey, served in the late war in South Africa, where he was severely wounded, and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order.

1919: Jun 03 - London Gazette
Bailey, Maj. Percy James, D.S.O., 12th Lancers `For valuable services rendered in connection with the War.` Lieutenant-Colonel Percy James Bailey, D.S.O., O.B.E., born December 1873, the eldest son of Sir James Bailey;

1895: Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 12th Lancers
1897: May - Promoted Lieutenant
1900: Feb-May - served with the Regiment in South Africa and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein, and present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, including the actions at Paardeberg, Poplar Grove
1900: Mar 07 - severely wounded, Driefontein, Houtnek, and Zand River
1900: May-Jun - served during operations in the Transvaal, including the actions at Johannesburg and Diamond Hill
1900: May-Nov in the Orange River Colony, including the actions at Lindley, Bethlehem, and Wittebergen
1900: Oct 11 - appointed a Brigade Signalling Officer (graded Staff Captain), and afterwards served on the Staff as a Staff Officer to a Column;
1901: Apr - promoted Captain
1902: Jun 17 - Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette), and appointed a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order.
1902: Oct 24 - He received his D.S.O. from H.M. the King.
1905: Aug - Aug 1909, Bailey served as Adjutant and Quartermaster, Cavalry School
1908: Aug 22 - promoted to Major
1914: Aug 17 - served with the Regiment during the Great War on the Western Front
1919: Jan 03 - appointed Assistant Commandant, Remount Service, Shirehampton, Southern Command
1919: Apr 06 - Deputy Director of Remounts, General Headquarters, British Armies of the Rhine
1947: Dec 12 - retired with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.
1947: Feb 01 - Percy died.

Percy: Lt Col Percy James Bailey, D.S.O, O.B.E died in the Mar quarter of 1947 at North Cotswold (7b 720) age 73 & Dorothy died in the Mar quarter of 1971 at Westminster (5e 2350) age 86.

Known Residence: Fosseway House, Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucester.

A search has uncovered a site where Percy's mendals are for sale: (LINK)

 

04 - MARIE ELIZABETH BAILEY 

Marie was born in 1876.

Marie married William Parish Robertson (1879) in the Jun quarter of 1906 at St George’s Hanover Square (1a 927).
It appears Marie and William had no children.

William Parish Robertson born Sept 05 1879 at Lima, Peru was an English cricketer who played first-class cricket for Middlesex County Cricket Club between 1900 and 1919. A wicket-keeper, Robertson also played as a right-handed batsman. He scored 4,510 runs and claimed 61 catches and 15 stumpings in first-class cricket.
Education: Harrow School; Cambridge University
William Robertson was in the Harrow XI from 1896 to 1898, he went to Cambridge and gained a Blue in 1901. A fast-scoring, attractive batsman, he subsequently played for Middlesex up to 1914. In 1914 he scored 580 runs, average 38.66, in Championship matches, including 130 against Nottinghamshire at Trent Bridge. He toured America in 1899 under K. S. Ranjitsinhji.

William died in the Jun quarter (May 07) of 1950 at Saffron Waldon (4a 622) age 70
Marie died in 1959:
O
n her death in Dec quarter of 1959 at Saffron Waldon at the age of 84 Marie left her estate to her niece, Augusta’s daughter Nancy Augusta Grey née Nickalls.

05 - LIEUT-COLONEL FREDERICK GEORGE GLYN BAILEY

Frederick was born on March 29th 1880.

Frederick married Lady Janet Lyle MacKay (1886)on July 14, 1908 at St George’s Hanover Square (1a 1017).
Janet was the daughter of Sir James Lyle Mackay 1st Earl of Inchcape of Caithness, Aberdeen. and his wife Jean Paterson Shanks
She was invested as a Companion, Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem (C.St.J.)
Frederick and Janet had five children:

[1] Douglas James Bailey (1909-1944) Douglas was a Major in the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) and was killed in action in Italy on May 15th 1944 age 35. Douglas married Joan Sophia Grenfell at Westminster in the Sept quarter of 1935.

 
Name; Douglas James Bailey - age 35
Rank: Major
Service No: 113751
Date of Death: 15/05/1944
Regiment/Service: Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) - 2nd Bn
Cemetery Link: CASSINO WAR CEMETERY
Additional Information: Son of Frederick George Glyn Bailey and Janet Lyle Bailey; husband of Joan Sophie Bailey, of Childrey, Berkshire.
Link: War Graves Reference Page

[2] Joan Muriel Bailey (1910-1944) Joan married John Chetwode at Amesbury in the Sept quarter of 1934. John was a Lieutenant on the HMS Gloucester and was killed of Crete on May 22nd 1941 age 31.
Joan and John had two children – John Simon Knightly (1935-1977) and Janet Amanda Alice (1937).

 
Name; John Chetwode - age 31
Rank: Lieutenant (S)
Service No:  
Date of Death: 22/05/1941
Regiment/Service: Royal Naval Reserve - H.M.S. Gloucester
Cemetery Link: PLYMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL
Additional Information:  
Link: War Graves Reference Page

It appears Joan remarried to Joseph A Collings at Salisbury in the Sept quarter of 1947 (needs confirming)
Joan was killed in a motor accident. Maybe at Barnstable Devon in 1951?

[3] Oswald Nigel Bailey (1913-1991) born Jun 19th 1913 Oswald was a Captain in the Royal Navy and an OBE. He died on Jul 22nd 1991 and is buried in St Michaels Churchyard Wilsford Salisbury.

[4] Felicity Ann Bailey (1917-1984). Felicity married Horace Anthony Claude Rumbold (1911) at Westminster in the Jun quarter of 1937. Felicity became Lady Falicity Rumbold

Sir Anthony Rumbold 10th Baronet - Horace Anthony Claude Rumbold, son of Sir Horace Rumbold, 9th Baronet, was educated at Eton College and Magdalen College, Oxford, and was for a short time a Fellow of Queen's College, Oxford, before joining the Diplomatic Service in 1935. He was posted to Washington, DC, in 1937, returning to the Foreign Office in 1942 before being posted to Italy in 1944 to the staff of the Minister Resident at Allied Headquarters in the Mediterranean, Harold Macmillan. He moved to Prague in 1947, returned to the Foreign Office again in 1949 as head of the Southern Europe department with the rank of Counsellor, and was posted to Paris in 1951 with the same rank. In March 1954 he was appointed principal private secretary (PPS) to the Foreign Secretary, Anthony Eden. He accompanied Eden on several overseas visits including the Geneva Conference in May 1954, Eden and Winston Churchill's trip to Washington in June for talks with the Secretary of State (John Foster Dulles) and President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and a tour of European capitals in September 1954.
When Churchill resigned and Eden became Prime Minister in April 1955, Rumbold remained for a few months as PPS to the new Foreign Secretary, Harold Macmillan, accompanying him to San Francisco in June 1955 for talks between the Foreign Ministers of the United States, Britain, France and Russia in preparation for the Geneva Summit in the following month.
Rumbold left the Foreign Office for a time, then returned, and was an assistant Under-Secretary of State 1957–60, responsible for European and East-West relations. Again he accompanied the Foreign Secretary, now Selwyn Lloyd, in international talks including Eisenhower's visit to England in August 1959, and was British representative on working groups preparing for the frequent top-level conferences at that time, including the 1960 Paris Summit which failed because of the U-2 incident just before the summit took place.
In June 1960 Rumbold was appointed Minister in Paris (under the Ambassador, Sir Pierson Dixon); The Times suggested that he could have been appointed as Ambassador in a smaller mission if he had not chosen to remain on the "inner circuit" of major capitals. In 1965 he was appointed Ambassador to Thailand; while he was there he was also UK representative on the Council of SEATO. In 1967 he received his final appointment as Ambassador to Austria. He retired from the Diplomatic Service in 1970.
In 1974 Sir Anthony and Lady Rumbold were divorced and he married Pauline Tennant, whose first husband had been the anthropologist and ethnographer Julian Pitt-Rivers. Pauline was an actress in her youth, she became a woman of letters. Pauline Laetitia Tennant was born on February 6 1927. Her early childhood was spent in a grey stone manor house in the green valley of Teffont Magna, Wiltshire. They had no children.

Lady Felicity and Horace had four children: Serena Caroline (1939) Venitia Mary (1941) Camillia Charlotte (1945) Henry John Sabastion (1947)

[5] James Mackay Bailey (1922-1980) - No information found

Lieut. Frederick George Glyn Bailey, went out to South Africa as a Yeoman, and was promoted by Lord Roberts to a Commission in the Royal Horse Artillery;

Timeline of career :
Born 29 March 1880, the second son of Sir James Bailey, Knight, Shortgrove Hall, Newport, Essex
1898: - Educated at Harrow School from 1894 to 1898; and at Trinity College, Cambridge - Received the 2nd Prize for Sabre in Public Schools' Gym.
1900: - Enlisted in the South Notts Yeomanry (Service No. 3471) and served in the Boer War as a Lance Corporal in 12th Company, 3 Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry. Noted as missing in action at Swartzkopjeftn on 19 Apr 1900. Later rejoined unit. Present at the actions aroung Boshof, Rustenburg and Machadodorp.
1900: July 25 - Commissioned as a 2nd Lieut, RFA
1908: - Frederick married Lady Janet Lyle Mckay, the second daughter of the 1st Earl of Inchscape, and they had three sons (one KIA in May 1944) and two daughters
1903: July 25 - Promoted to Lieutenant, RFA
1911: Aug 15 - Promoted to Captain, RFA
1914: Nov 30 - Promoted to Major, RFA
1915: Formed the first Royal Artillery Cadet School
1915: Officer Cmdg, B Reserve Brigade, RHA till Aug 31, 1916
1916: Aug 31 - GSO 1 to to Apr 14, 1917
1916: Apr 17 - Temporary Lieut. Colonel to Apr 14, 1917
1917: Jan 01 - Brevet Lieut. Colonel
1917: Wounded - Mentioned in Despatches once
1918: Oct 02 - Lieut. Colonel, Reserve of Officers
1920: Feb 21 - Retired as a Lieut. Colonel
Member of the Stock Exchange, London
1937: - High Sheriff of Wilts
1941: - High Sheriff of Wilts
1925: - Adress was: 4 Audley Square, London W1

Frederick died on Oct 26th 1951 at Salisbury (7c 458) age 71.
He is buried in St Michael's Churchyard Wilsford, Salisbury

Headstone in St Michael's Churchyard , Wilsford, Salisbury
Sacred to the Memory of
FREDERICK GEORGE GYLN BAILEY
Lieutenant Colonel Retied Royal Artillery
Born 29th March 1880 - Died 26th October 1951
and of his dearly loved wife
LADY JANET LYLE BAILEY
Born 10th September 1886 – Died 1st January 1973
Both of Lake House and whose ashes lie
below this stone. Also of their children and
grandchildren whose names are engraved below.

JOAN MURIEL COLLINGS
Born 6th December 1910 – Died 7th September 1951
JAMES MCKAY BAILEY
Born 3rd March 1922 – Died 6th July 1980
FELICITY ANN RUMBOLD
Born 7th July 1917 – Died 4th July 1984
JOHN SIMON KNIGHTLEY CHETWODE SON OF JOAN COLLINGS
Born 1st August 1935 – Died 4th August 1977
OSWOLD NIGEL BAILEY
Captain Royal Navy OBE
Born 19th June 1913 – Died 22nd July 1991
JANET AMANDA ALICE CHETWODE
Born 2? May 1937 – Died 14th March 2004

Known Residence: Lake House, Wilsford, Salisbury.

06 - SIR SYDNEY ROBERT BAILEY KBE, CB, DSO

Sydney Robert Bailey was born on August 27th 1882.

Sydney Robert Bailey married Mildred Warner Washington Bromwell (1900) on Aug 15, 1922 at Charlevoix, Michigan U.S.A.
Mildred was the daughter of the late Col Bromwell of Washington USA
Robert and Mildred had children:

[1] Patricia Scott Bailey (1925) Patricia married 2nd Viscount Thomas Trenchard in the Jun quarter of 1948
Thomas Trenchard, 2nd Viscount Trenchard MC (15 December 1923–1987) Thomas was a hereditary peer and junior minister in Margaret Thatcher's Conservative government from 1979 to 1983. Thomas Trenchard was born in 1923, the son of Katherine and Hugh Trenchard, whom many regard as the father of the Royal Air Force.
Patricia and Thomas had two sons: John (1953) and Thomas Henry (1966)

[2] Sidney D S Bailey (1930) - Did Sidney marry Patricia A Gordon at Surry South West in the Jun quater of 1961?

Admiral SIR Sidney Robert Bailey, K.B.E., C.B., D.S.O.,
1896: Joined the Royal Navy as a cadet in the training ship HMS Britannia
1900: Took part in the Seymour Expedition for the relief of Peking in 1900 during the Boxer Rebellion
1902: Feb 27 – Lieutenant
1914: Jun 30 – Promoted to Commander
1914: He served as Gunnery Officer of H.M.S. Erin from 1914-1916.
1916: May 12 - He was appointed to Beatty's Staff, and acted as Flag Commander and War Staff Officer.
1916 : Served in World War I on the staff of the Commander-in-Chief, Grand Fleet seeing action at the Battle of Jutland
1919: April 05 - In recognition of his "ability and unremitting work on the Staff of Admiral Sir David Beatty, G.C.B., G.C.V.O., D.S.O., Commander-in-Chief, Grand Fleet," he was appointed a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.)
1921: He became naval attaché in Washington, D.C
1925: Naval Assistant to the First Sea Lord
1931: Chief of Staff of the Mediterranean Fleet
1933: He went on to be Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff
1934: Commander of the Battle cruiser Squadron
1935: He was acquitted at a Court Martial in early 1935, the charge of having suffering H.M.S. Hood and H.M.S. Renown to be hazarded" being found "not proved
1937: President of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich
1938: Jan 01 - He was appointed a Knight Commander of the Military Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (K.B.E.)
1939: Jul 31 - He was promoted to the rank of Admiral vice Pound.
1939: Dec 15 - retired
1942: Mar 27 – Sydney Died

Known Residence: Rickling House, Newport, Essex
Clubs: Marlborough, United Service
.

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